Abortion in the Bible?

The Spiritual Consequences of Abortion

Dear Christian Sisters & Brothers,

Yesterday, I posted about the psychological risks of abortion. Today, I’m starting a series on the spiritual consequences.

Why don’t we tell Christian women the risks to their souls before they choose life or abortion?

Of the women who are aborting, 36% go to church at least once per month. It doesn’t matter which denomination—from Catholic to Evangelical.

Abortions have been had by women in your church—some before she knew Christ and some afterward.

Before scheduling a meeting with your pastor or priest, read this blog series yourself. Because as a member of The Church, you are as much of the solution to our society’s ills as the leaders of your local church.

Finding Evidence in the Bible

After I was completely healed from my abortion, I asked God what happened to me spiritually. I knew there were no stories of abortion in the Bible, but I asked Him if there were a story that explained the spiritual consequences of my abortion. He led me to King David’s murder of Bathsheba’s husband Uriah.

David Had Bathsheba’s Husband Killed

You are probably familiar with David and Bathsheba’s story, but let me give you a quick summary. David stayed home when he should’ve been in battle (2 Samuel 11:1). He sent all his men to war, including Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah (2 Samuel 11:3, 23:39; 1 Chronicles 11:26, 41). While at home, David used his kingly power to have sex with Uriah’s wife (2 Samuel 11:2-5).

What we don’t know is whether David and Bathsheba “had eyes for each other” before the adultery or whether she had sex with him because he was the king and reasoned that she couldn’t say “no.” However, there are two indications that the latter is more likely true.

First, Bathsheba is referred to as “woman” and “Uriah’s wife” all through Second Samuel Chapter 11, which tells the story of infidelity and murder, leaving David as the focus of the story. We don’t learn her name until Chapter 12 verse 24 when David is consoling her after their baby dies.

Second, Bathsheba’s grandfather (2 Samuel 23:34; 11:3), who was David’s counselor (2 Samuel 15:12), later conspired against David (2 Samuel 23:34; 11:3; 15:12, 31). Therefore, I lean toward kingly pressure that today we call rape.

Whichever the case, the king is responsible for following the law of the land (Deuteronomy 17:18-20).

David tries to cover up his adultery by tricking Uriah into having sex with his wife. But Uriah is a man of higher character than David and won’t sleep with his wife when he should be away at war (2 Samuel 11:6-13). So David had Uriah killed to cover up his sin (2 Samuel 11:14-17).

David broke two commandments—adultery (Exodus 20:14; Deuteronomy 5:18) and murder (Exodus 20:13; Deuteronomy 5:17)—both of which had legal consequences of capital punishment (Leviticus 20:10; 24:17).

To learn more about how the story of King David’s affair and cover up relates to abortion, return tomorrow at 1 pm Eastern Time.

In Christ,

Cheryl

Author: Cheryl Krichbaum

Cheryl, author & speaker, helps you reach the abortion-minded for Christ and for life so that abortion within The Church is reduced from 36% to 0%. Her first book in the Faces of Abortion Series, ReTested, is available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

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