Walking Dead—the Natural Result of Abortion

Dear Christian Sisters & Brothers,

This is the last post in The Spiritual Consequences of Abortion Series, which includes:

To review, here’s what happens when we murder and have sex outside of marriage:

  • When we keep silent about our sin, our bodies waste away (Psalm 32:3).
  • The Lord’s hand is heavy upon us (Psalm 32:4).
  • Our vitality is drained away (Psalm 32:4).
  • We yearn to hear joy and gladness again (Psalm 51:8).
  • We can’t wait for our broken bones to rejoice (Psalm 51:8).
  • We want to be renewed with a steadfast spirit (Psalm 51:10).
  • We want to feel the Holy Spirit within us (Psalm 51:11).
  • We want to be restored with the joy of salvation (Psalm 51:12).

After studying Psalms 32 and 51, I understood what happened to me after I aborted my daughter: My vitality was drained away. That’s why I described myself as the walking dead.

My joy was sucked away. I wanted to feel the joy of my salvation, but I couldn’t until I took responsibility for my sins then confessed and forgave.

Saving Mothers, Too

Abortion not only murders our unborn, it kills women’s souls.

Speaking from experience, sin of this magnitude increases the gulf between us and God.

Reconciling with God becomes a much more difficult thing to do. There’s a big difference between reconciling with God after using His name in vain than after murdering His child.

Therefore, we don’t lose just one of God’s children to abortion but two—the woman and her baby.

And if the father of the baby (1st among influencers over a woman’s choice)—or the grandmother (3rd among influencers) or grandfather (10th among influencers)—supports, pressures, or coerces the woman to have an abortion, then we lose even more.

I say all of this to ask you to compassionately reach the abortion-minded—all those who support abortion as a choice—for Christ so that we not only save the babies but also their mothers, fathers, and grandparents.

Christ came for the tax collectors and the prostitutes, and we are to do the same for all sinners, even those who make us angry.

In Christ,

Cheryl

Author of ReTested: The Story of a Post-Abortive Woman Called to Change the Conversation, finalist for the Author Academy Awards

Citation:
Care Net. 2016, July. “Study of Women Who Have Had an Abortion & Their Views on Church.” Go to: https://resources.care-net.org/free-resources/#lp-pom-text-318

Abortion in the Bible?

Dear Christian Sisters & Brothers,

Yesterday, I posted about the psychological risks of abortion. Today, I’m starting a series on the spiritual consequences.

Why don’t we tell Christian women the risks to their souls before they choose life or abortion?

Of the women who are aborting, 36% go to church at least once per month. It doesn’t matter which denomination—from Catholic to Evangelical.

Abortions have been had by women in your church—some before she knew Christ and some afterward.

Before scheduling a meeting with your pastor or priest, read this blog series yourself. Because as a member of The Church, you are as much of the solution to our society’s ills as the leaders of your local church.

Finding Evidence in the Bible

After I was completely healed from my abortion, I asked God what happened to me spiritually. I knew there were no stories of abortion in the Bible, but I asked Him if there were a story that explained the spiritual consequences of my abortion. He led me to King David’s murder of Bathsheba’s husband Uriah.

David Had Bathsheba’s Husband Killed

You are probably familiar with David and Bathsheba’s story, but let me give you a quick summary. David stayed home when he should’ve been in battle (2 Samuel 11:1). He sent all his men to war, including Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah (2 Samuel 11:3, 23:39; 1 Chronicles 11:26, 41). While at home, David used his kingly power to have sex with Uriah’s wife (2 Samuel 11:2-5).

What we don’t know is whether David and Bathsheba “had eyes for each other” before the adultery or whether she had sex with him because he was the king and reasoned that she couldn’t say “no.” However, there are two indications that the latter is more likely true.

First, Bathsheba is referred to as “woman” and “Uriah’s wife” all through Second Samuel Chapter 11, which tells the story of infidelity and murder, leaving David as the focus of the story. We don’t learn her name until Chapter 12 verse 24 when David is consoling her after their baby dies.

Second, Bathsheba’s grandfather (2 Samuel 23:34; 11:3), who was David’s counselor (2 Samuel 15:12), later conspired against David (2 Samuel 23:34; 11:3; 15:12, 31). Therefore, I lean toward kingly pressure that today we call rape.

Whichever the case, the king is responsible for following the law of the land (Deuteronomy 17:18-20).

David tries to cover up his adultery by tricking Uriah into having sex with his wife. But Uriah is a man of higher character than David and won’t sleep with his wife when he should be away at war (2 Samuel 11:6-13). So David had Uriah killed to cover up his sin (2 Samuel 11:14-17).

David broke two commandments—adultery (Exodus 20:14; Deuteronomy 5:18) and murder (Exodus 20:13; Deuteronomy 5:17)—both of which had legal consequences of capital punishment (Leviticus 20:10; 24:17).

To learn more about how the story of King David’s affair and cover up relates to abortion, return tomorrow at 1 pm Eastern Time.

In Christ,

Cheryl

The “Perfect” Abortion

The potential side effects are serious

Dear Christian Sisters and Brothers,

I was okay right up until my baby died. I remember exactly when she left me because I could feel my face fall. I wasn’t okay anymore. Whatever joy I had left was sucked out of me right along with my baby, and I have been fighting to get it back ever since.

That’s when I became the walking dead. Abortion didn’t just murder my baby, it drained life from my soul—and I didn’t even realize it.

My abortion went so “perfectly” that I could have been the poster woman for the pro-choice movement. I had little bleeding. I only had cramps the day of the procedure but not after that. I was still able to have children. I wasn’t depressed. (I was in spiritual bondage, but I wasn’t depressed.) Everyone around me reacted the way I wanted them to—not telling me what to do but supporting me in my decision. My abortion was just as easy as the pro-choice movement advertises.

But as I’ve learned, that’s certainly not the case for all women. Many post-abortive women struggle with:

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • alcoholism
  • drug abuse
  • suicide attempts (Coleman 2011)

Why don’t we tell women the risks to their mental health before they choose?

In Christ,

Cheryl

Coleman PK. Abortion and mental health: quantitative synthesis and analysis of research published 1995–2009. The British Journal of Psychiatry (2011) 199, 180–186.